Eric Fischl — If Art Could Talk

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Eric Fischl: If Art Could Talk
Mousse Publishing

2018
English
128 pages
Hardcover, 20 × 25.5 cm
ISBN: 9788867493326

Texts by Peter Doroshenko, Eric Fischl

“I am one of the first generation artists who grew up in the suburbs. We grew up, post-WWII, in an ascendant America in which the suburbs was its utopian manifestation. We came into our art maturity painfully aware of the disconnection between what was promised and what was delivered.”
—Eric Fischl

Eric Fischl (New York, 1948) is one of only a handful of contemporary painters who regularly, though by no means exclusively, employs sourced images, culled from the internet, newspapers, and magazines, to inform his paintings. The artist then adds his own photographs and blends a final ensemble of information and storytelling. No kings or generals or momentous battles move across Fischl’s canvases, and most of his subjects are quotidian rather than grandiose—suburban bourgeois families, art world mongers and awkward social interactions. In his works, communication is nonexistent and boredom is pervasive. The book, published on the occasion of a solo show held at Dallas Contemporary museum, includes more than 120 painting reproductions and a conversation between Eric Fischl and Peter Doroshenko.

Mousse Publishing

Women by Masha Demianova for Osphilia

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Women by Masha Demianova for Osphilia

osphilia.co

Olma Posters

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olma.ch

Voice of Coffee — Yusuke Seki

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Voice of Coffee
Design by Yusuke Seki

A modern storefront brings the past to light
This coffee shop, located just off of a bustling district in Kobe, is housed in a former barbershop. The three letters above the entrance, “AAA,” are a vestige of its former use, reminding visitors of the history of the site. The façade, which used to extend to the street, has been set back and opened up as a glass front. The intervention creates an ENGAWA, a traditionally Japanese threshold space between the street and the shop interior, where guests can sit and enjoy their drinks while protected under a roof. While the setback reduces the actual amount of space inside the store, the addition of another spatial layer between interior and street ends up making the store feel deeper, and thus more spacious, than before.

The storefront incorporates a number of unusual strategies that are meant to momentarily throw off visitors, giving them pause and a chance to take a closer look at the details. Take, for example, the lower half of the front, which is composed of glass bricks stacked on top of one another. Whereas glass bricks are usually kept in place by a general metal frame, these elements are held together by the binding concrete alone – an unprecedented construction in Japan. The door handle, on the other hand, is made of two panes of glass, glued using a special adhesive on both sides of the glass door. The result is a completely transparent doorway, which allows guests to appreciate the natural hues of the material itself. The interior features a cupboard of glass and steel, whose gull-wing mechanism was developed by Yusuke Seki specially for this store.

Almost all of the structural elements were left as they were found during the demolition process. The wooden screen below the ceiling, for example, is the original timber frame that held up the suspended ceiling in the space’s former life, rediscovered as workers removed the plaster that had hidden it for years. The walls, too, have been left as they were after the workers had removed the finish covering them. Paradoxically, this subtractive approach has an accumulative effect: every detail come to light, every inscription left behind by a worker a generation ago, serves to make history visible, adds to the sense of time passing. This sense is heightened by a special detail: a layer of silver leaf, barely appreciable, applied to the wall near the back of the store. Over time, as the silver oxidizes, this square will change colors to a warm gold.

Yusuke Seki are Japan based Design team.
Their approach to design challenges is to conceptualise and revaluate into irreplaceable design with new interpretations. His designs embrace simplicity and minimalism at first glance and his inspiration comes directly from aspects which already exist within the context: such as materials, location, histories; all gathered and represented through the formal design approach. The function is essential in his design but through his work he focuses on facts and phenomena from the environment, including the essential design methods from the past, passed through to the future.

Voice of Coffee
Yusuke Seki

Jean-Michel Basquiat — Furious Man, 1982

Jean-Michel Basquiat - Furious Man, 1982

Jean-Michel Basquiat
Furious Man, 1982
Oilstick, acrylic, wax crayon and ink on paper

Mousse 64

Mousse 64 Summer 2018 Cover

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Mousse 64
Summer 2018

Mousse Magazine

Hu Ming — Dumplings

Hu Ming - Dumplings - Oil on Canvas

Hu Ming
Dumplings, 2013
Oil on canvas

Nike Just Don’t Quit

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Design by Hort

CURA. 28 — The Ultimate Body Issue

CURA. 28

CURA. 28
The Ultimate Body Issue

Our yearlong investigation into the body continues
CURA. 28 is devoted to different artistic experiences and practices—crossing generations, time, space, and media—revolving around the boundaries, powers, forms and interpretations of the body that exist within the present world.

What’s more

Bodies on the cover
A double cover by artists Amalia Ulman and Hannah Levy is presented by texts from Travis Diehl and Kat Herriman. In Ulman’s work the body—her body—is both the protagonist of a relentless re-enactment and a means to question the boundaries between illusion and truth. Levy’s sculptural installations and performances explore the figure and its politics through the objects we surround ourselves with.

Body of Work
Vincent Honoré’s conversation with Lynn Hershman Leeson provides an opportunity to delve into the artist’s multiform production, capable of creating a bridge between the political movements of the ’60s and the most contemporary themes of technology and science. Prem Sahib and Celia Hempton have been invited to reflect visually on their “body of work,” creating links between their own artistic production and the images which shape their personal imaginary: their visual essays are introduced by Huw Lemmey and Kathy Noble.

Political Bodies
Three essays reflect on the body from different perspectives: the dancing body, the loving body, and the collective body. Manuel Segade writes about the practice of voguing and radical performance, analyzing, amongst other examples, Charles Atlas’ major work Butchers’ Vogue and Glenn Ligon’s Condition Report; Fiona Alison Duncan talks about her project Pillow Talk, intended as a platform to discuss sex, gender, and love in our discomforting, novel, and wild time; finally Penny Rafferty interprets a selection of artistic collectives, examining their modes of production and communication tactics.

The Conversations
Anna Gritz enters into a dialogue with Sidsel Meineche Hansen about her ongoing research on sex dolls and robots; Piper Marshall’s 25 questions are this time addressed to Madeline Hollander, who explains the processes and concerns at the heart of her choreographic performances; while Margot Norton retraces with Anna K.E. the pivotal moments of the artist’s production, from her early video works to her most recent installations.

What’s HOT!
The HOT! section is devoted to a series of artists who—using different media and working in a variety of contexts—focus on the body as a subject, a theme, a key to understand the structure and the mechanisms of the surrounding world: Aria Dean is presented by Attilia Fattori Franchini; Louis Fratino by Alex Bennett; Young Joon Kwak by Ceci Moss; Julien Ceccaldi by Whitney Mallett; Stine Deja by Alice Bucknell; Paul Mpagi Sepuya by Nikki Darling; Yu Ji by Todd Von Ammon; D S Chapman by Micol Hebron; Nabuqi by Loïc Le Gall.

You can find CURA. 28 “The Ultimate Body Issue” in the best international bookshops in Italy and abroad, order your copy on CURA. website or find it at Art Basel (June 14–17). Or… stop by BASEMENT ROMA and buy one.

CURA. 28

032c Issue #34 — Summer 2018: “The Big Flat Now”

032c Issue #34
Summer 2018: “The Big Flat Now”

We regret to inform you that there is no future. Nor is there a past. music, art, technology, pop culture, and fashion have evaporated as well. There is only one thing left: the big flat now.

For 032c’s Issue 34, we offer 12 theses for consumption and creativity in the infinite present, rendered by Peruvian graphic designer JONATHAN CASTRO. An expert at the multi-disciplinary, rapper TRAVIS SCOTT expounds his love of fans and fatherhood from the driveway of his Texan Lamborghini horse ranch. Gucci’s creative director ALESSANDRO MICHELE explains the origin of his magic mushroom and the meaning of time, while performance artist and WorldWideWitch community creator JOHANNES PAUL RAETHER introduces us to his many selves. Nonagenarian and artist LUCHITA HURTADO, who once had her feet massaged by Marcel Duchamp, looks back on a century of modern art in conversation with HANS ULRICH OBRIST, while London-based art and car collector KENNY SCHACHTER takes us on a tour of his home / art studio / garage. Photographer WOLFGANG TILLMANS sends in personal dispatches from his debut exhibition in Kinshasa, and we visit the COSMIC COMMUNITIES who used outer space and psychedelia as tools for sexual liberation. Elsewhere, Alyx’s MATTHEW WILLIAMS and NIKE test the post-human frontiers of apparel design, documented in an editorial by NICK KNIGHT. Italian supermodel MARIACARLA BOSCONO lives out fetish fantasies, and PETRA COLLINS and PIERRE-ANGE CARLOTTI pledge themselves to one another “Forever.” Anti-heartthrob actor VOLKER BRUCH gets bloody-eyed while considering his transatlantic fame. We speak to RICH THE KID about his perfect day, and hang with BROCKHAMPTON, TREVOR PAGLEN, BRIA VINAITE, and TAKAHIRO MIYASHITA.

032c Magazine

City by Landscape — Rainer Schmidt Landscape Architects

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City by Landscape
Rainer Schmidt Landscape Architects

Design by Hort

I Do It Exceptionally Well. I Do It So It Feels Like Hell. — 032c

I Do It Exceptionally Well. I Do It So It Feels Like Hell.

“I Do It Exceptionally Well. I Do It So It Feels Like Hell.”

Roman supermodel Mariacarla Boscono explores latex vacuums and consensual suspension with photographer Thomas Lohr for the editorial “I do it exceptionally well, I do it so it feels like hell,” styled by 032c’s fashion director Marc Goehring.

Click to see Mariacarla and performer Bianca O’Brien in the video ➝

And yes, that’s the What We Believe Writer’s Belt shining underneath the mood slime.

032c magazine

European Cultural Academy — Courses in Contemporary Architecture and Design

Courses in Contemporary Architecture and Design during Venice Biennale

Courses in Contemporary Architecture and Design during Venice Biennale
Summer courses at the European Cultural Academy in Venice
May 22–November 17, 2018

European Cultural Academy
4013 Campo Manin
30124 Venice
Italy

Courses in Contemporary Architecture and Design during Venice Biennale 2018.
The European Cultural Academy, Venice offers three summer courses this year that focus on architecture, the Biennale and design, specifically developed to align with the 16. Biennale Architettura—FREESPACE topic. The courses are constructed by James Taylor-Foster Contemporary curator at ArkDes, Sweden’s national centre for architecture and design and former European editor-at-large at ArchDaily.

Contemporary Architecture
The course fosters an understanding of the relationship between buildings and the city at large. Buildings are not isolated objects: they must react and respond to very particular urban conditions if they are to stand the test of time and, of course, delight us. In Venice this concern is particularly acute. These fundamental observations form the springboard for this course. The course is a combination of theory, workshops and visits. The introduction to People and Places provides the theoretical background while the workshop Drawing, Modelling & Photography provides the practical component. This segment of the course examines the three core tools in the architects’ toolbox: two- dimensional drawing, three-dimensional modelling, photography, and film. Visits include amongst others the Fondaco dei Tedeschi (by OMA), Venice Biennale and Punta della Dogana (by Tadao Ando).

Venice Biennale
This course gets to the grips with the 16th Architecture Biennale. Tours and reflections by experts and practitioners allows you to take the time to really see and understand the Biennale, large in scale and, for that reason, oftentimes intimidating: its history, contemporary position on the world stage, it’s unique model of exhibiting, and why it’s considered to be so important. Explore various ways to find your place in it: either as participant, organiser or experienced visitor. Visit the best country pavilions and have private tours with the organiser of Fentress Architects and Studio Daniel Libeskind installations.

Design: The World Around Us
This course focusses on understanding the role of design in relation to the built environment. In order to do this, it examines design as a broad topic: we are not interested in chairs, tables, and coffee cups. Design as field impacts all of us—at every moment of the day and across multiple scales. By exploring its relationship to architecture and urbanism, we aim to reveal its enduring relevance. The course is a combination of design theory and the significance of design at all scales, and what it means for our daily life. Further it explores colour theory, including myths and truths about the perception of colours. Visits include the iconic design sights such as the Olivetti Showroom and Orsoni Colour Library and meetings at local design studios.

europeanculturalacademy.com

ARCH+ 231 — The Property Issue

ARCH+ 231: The Property Issue

ARCH+ 231: The Property Issue

ARCH+ collaborated with Arno Brandlhuber and Olaf Grawert (station+, DARCH, ETH Zürich) to edit the volume “The Property Issue. Ground Control and the Commons.” The issue, which is the outcome of their research on property, aims to help change how we view urban land, and encourage land law reform to return land governance to the local level. Brandlhuber, who is a professor at the Department of Architecture at ETH Zürich, contributed with a series of interviews he conducted for the feature film “The Property Drama.” The film was realized together film director Christopher Roth as part of the “Legislating Architecture” series, which explores the rules and laws of architecture.

“Who owns the land that we are building on?” is a question central to all societies, because space is as vital a resource as air and water. And yet architects seldom explicitly address the question of land ownership. “The Property Issue” establishes a connection between rising land prices and the disintegration of urban communities. Interviews with architects, urban planners, and politicians address the ability of planning, politics, and society to affect change on a political, economic, and spatial level. Many other contributions on politics and economics reveal not only prevailing lines of conflict, but also the potential to redefine policy with the long-term aim of establishing land, and thus the city, as a commons.

Further contributors include Oana Bogdan, Arno Brandlhuber, Anina Brisolla, Dogma/Realism Working Group, Egbert Dransfeld, Silvia Federici, Michaela Friedberg, Renée Gailhoustet, Olaf Grawert, Marisa González, Dolores Hayden, Florian Hertweck, Markus Hesse, Naomi Klein, Dirk Löhr, Christian Schulz, Niklas Maak, Marija Marić, Oksana Mironova, Peter Mörtenböck, Helge Mooshammer, Joseph Nevins, Raquel Rolnik, Christopher Roth, Wolfgang Scheppe, Trebor Scholz, Patrik Schumacher, Manuel Shvartzberg Carrió, Robert Thum, Milica Topalović, Harald Trapp, Douglas Spencer, and Hans-Jochen Vogel.

ARCH+ 231: 
The Property Issue. Ground Control and the Commons 

Co-edited by Arno Brandlhuber and Olaf Grawert (station+, DARCH, ETH Zürich)
Spring 2018

232 pages, English language 


archplus.net
station.plus

Natural & Naked — Girls Uncensored

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Natural & Naked
Girls Uncensored

Photographer: Mikhail Paramonov

Bright beauties with long legs, firm breasts and soft skin. Natural, young and sexy, just as nature created her. Naked, free and without shame, girls eagerly display their hottest assets to the viewer.

Publisher: Goliath
ISBN: 978-3-95730-034-8
Size / Format: 14 x 21 cm / 5.5” x 8.5”
Pages / Seiten: 288
Images / Fotos: 300
Hardcover

Buy on Amazon UK, DE, ES, IT, FR

Mikhail Paramonov

Mikhail Paramonov was born in 1975 in St. Petersburg, Russia. He studied art at the Theatric Academy in St. Petersburg and began concentrating on erotic photo­graphy in 2002. He has a love for the natural beauty of women: a fresh, flawless and perfectly immaculate look. Paramonov’s images have great diversity ranging from beautiful outdoor shots to glamorous compositions taken in romantic interiors to classic studio photography. His work has been featured in several magazines and books.