Marina Apollonio — Gradazione 15 Blu/Bianco su Rosso, 1971

Marina Apollonio - Gradazione 15 Blu/Bianco su Rosso, 1971

Marina Apollonio (Italian, b.1940)
Gradazione 15 Blu/Bianco su Rosso, 1971
Acrylic on canvas

Helmut Lang Spring 2018 Campaign

Helmut Lang Spring 2018 Campaign

Helmut Lang Spring 2018 Campaign

Helmut Lang Spring 2018 Campaign

Helmut Lang Spring 2018 Campaign

Unia Pakhomova by Nicolai Howalt for Helmut Lang
Spring 2018 Campaign

helmutlang.com

Parts — Von Mitchell

Parts (zine) – Currated Bodies and Parts by Von Mitchell 01

Parts (zine) – Currated Bodies and Parts by Von Mitchell 03

Parts (zine) – Currated Bodies and Parts by Von Mitchell 02

PARTS ZINE(ebook): Photo magazine, show cases multiple beautiful bodies. Fully nude and uncensored.
By: @vonxmitch

Buy Parts (zine) – Currated Bodies and Parts

Marquis de Sade — 100 Erotic Illustrations

Marquis de Sade - 100 Erotic Illustrations Cover

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Marquis de Sade – 100 Erotic Illustrations

Publisher: Goliath
Size / Format: 14 x 21 cm / 5.5” x 8.5”
Pages / Seiten: 112
Images / Illustrations: 100
Hardcover

English, German, Français, Español, Italiano

In France at the end of the eighteenth century, Donatien Alphonse François, Marquis de Sade, hired an artist to illustrate his collected writings. This edition, published in 1797, contained 101 copper engravings with sex scenes, most of them of a sadomasochistic leaning. At the time, such “cochonneries” (obscenities) brought one directly into a dungeon. For this reason, most artists in the erotic genre remained anonymous, something which makes it difficult today to ascribe authorship.

The Marquis de Sade, born in Paris in 1740, a relative of the French royal family, is known to this day as perversion personified. He grew up in the care of an uncle, and became an officer in the carabineer regiment. After fighting in the Seven Years’ War, however, he radically changed his lifestyle, and the Marquis quickly squandered his entire fortune in gambling rooms and on mistresses. His parents then married him to a wealthy woman, but this did nothing to hold him back from various extramarital relationships.

De Sade associated with prostitutes, and is also said not only to have regularly compelled servants and maids to perform sexual acts, but – even worse at that time – also “blasphemous” acts. It was because of this lifestyle change, officially labelled “lewd”, that in 1765 he was imprisoned for the first time. Unrepentant, though, afterwards he continued to throw orgies. He did not always invite people to this orgies, instead at times taking advantage of his social position to force them to parti­cipate. In 1768 he was denounced for the serious abuse and whipping of a lady, but was able to avoid a trial by paying an indemnity.

Following this, two prostitutes made the allegation that De Sade had used an aphrodisiac to make them compliant for group sex and anal intercourse. This time the Marquis had to flee – he hastened away to Italy, taking his young sister-in-law with him. He was sentenced to death in his absence. In 1777 he returned to Paris and was arrested, though his death sentence was reduced to life imprisonment. It was during his incarceration that he wrote the most part of his works. Knowing how offensive his writings were to both the moral and religious norms of the times, he attempted not to draw attention to himself through high paper use, and wrote everything in tiny handwriting. In 1789, with the storming of the Bastille, De Sade was freed, but many of his writings were destroyed in the revolutionary turmoil.

As a noble person, De Sade was unwilling to adapt to the social changes of the revolution, and was incarcerated once again and for the second time sentenced to death. As a result of Robespierre’s fall in 1794, however, he escaped the guillotine, and finally came free from prison, only to be sent a short time later to a lunatic asylum because of his debts and a lawsuit. The diagnosis was “insanely obsessed with vice”. His death in 1814, at least, was “natural” by the standards of his time.

The Marquis de Sade’s writings have since experienced a great deal: they have been forbidden, burnt, banned, censored, and interpreted by notable psychologists and writers. This is not surprising since they are complex, contain shocking scenes between all genders, as well as humiliation, sodomy, incest and murder, hemmed with moral-philosophical discussions, anti-clericalism and justifications for (his) radical egoism. In the age of YouPorn, however, De Sade’s scandalous writings are far below the arousal threshold that their image would lead us to assume.

Goliath Books

Villa Waalre by Russell Jones

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Villa Waalre by Russell Jones 008

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Villa Waalre by Russell Jones 003

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Villa Waalre by Russell Jones

Designed by Russell Jones, Villa Waalre is a minimalist house located in Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

Russel Jones

Photography by Rory Gardiner

Christopher Wool — Head

Christopher Wool - Head

Christopher Wool
Head, 1992

executed 1992
enamel on aluminum
132.10 x 91.40 cm

Jean Luce — Dinner Plate, France ca.1937

Jean Luce - Dinner Plate, France ca.1937 01

Jean Luce - Dinner Plate, France ca.1937 x 4

This is a dinner plate. It was designed by Jean Luce and made by Charles Ahrenfeldt. It is dated ca. 1937 and acquired by Cooper Hewitt in 1969. The plate is glazed, molded porcelain with enamel, gold, and platinum, and forms part of the Product Design and Decorative Arts department.

Exhibited at the 1937 Paris International Exposition, this plate’s red-orange enamel field features three L-shaped decorative bands, two in gold and one in platinum. The bold graphics and precious metals, together with the background color and the clean geometric shape, achieve a combination of revolution and luxury that demonstrates art deco style.

Donated by James M. Osborn and catalogued by Janet Thorpe. It is credited Gift of James M. Osborn.

Cooper Hewitt Collection

Eric Fischl — If Art Could Talk

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Eric Fischl: If Art Could Talk
Mousse Publishing

2018
English
128 pages
Hardcover, 20 × 25.5 cm
ISBN: 9788867493326

Texts by Peter Doroshenko, Eric Fischl

“I am one of the first generation artists who grew up in the suburbs. We grew up, post-WWII, in an ascendant America in which the suburbs was its utopian manifestation. We came into our art maturity painfully aware of the disconnection between what was promised and what was delivered.”
—Eric Fischl

Eric Fischl (New York, 1948) is one of only a handful of contemporary painters who regularly, though by no means exclusively, employs sourced images, culled from the internet, newspapers, and magazines, to inform his paintings. The artist then adds his own photographs and blends a final ensemble of information and storytelling. No kings or generals or momentous battles move across Fischl’s canvases, and most of his subjects are quotidian rather than grandiose—suburban bourgeois families, art world mongers and awkward social interactions. In his works, communication is nonexistent and boredom is pervasive. The book, published on the occasion of a solo show held at Dallas Contemporary museum, includes more than 120 painting reproductions and a conversation between Eric Fischl and Peter Doroshenko.

Mousse Publishing

Women by Masha Demianova for Osphilia

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Women by Masha Demianova for Osphilia 02

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Women by Masha Demianova for Osphilia

osphilia.co

Olma Posters

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Olma Posters 02

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olma.ch

Voice of Coffee — Yusuke Seki

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Voice of Coffee
Design by Yusuke Seki

A modern storefront brings the past to light
This coffee shop, located just off of a bustling district in Kobe, is housed in a former barbershop. The three letters above the entrance, “AAA,” are a vestige of its former use, reminding visitors of the history of the site. The façade, which used to extend to the street, has been set back and opened up as a glass front. The intervention creates an ENGAWA, a traditionally Japanese threshold space between the street and the shop interior, where guests can sit and enjoy their drinks while protected under a roof. While the setback reduces the actual amount of space inside the store, the addition of another spatial layer between interior and street ends up making the store feel deeper, and thus more spacious, than before.

The storefront incorporates a number of unusual strategies that are meant to momentarily throw off visitors, giving them pause and a chance to take a closer look at the details. Take, for example, the lower half of the front, which is composed of glass bricks stacked on top of one another. Whereas glass bricks are usually kept in place by a general metal frame, these elements are held together by the binding concrete alone – an unprecedented construction in Japan. The door handle, on the other hand, is made of two panes of glass, glued using a special adhesive on both sides of the glass door. The result is a completely transparent doorway, which allows guests to appreciate the natural hues of the material itself. The interior features a cupboard of glass and steel, whose gull-wing mechanism was developed by Yusuke Seki specially for this store.

Almost all of the structural elements were left as they were found during the demolition process. The wooden screen below the ceiling, for example, is the original timber frame that held up the suspended ceiling in the space’s former life, rediscovered as workers removed the plaster that had hidden it for years. The walls, too, have been left as they were after the workers had removed the finish covering them. Paradoxically, this subtractive approach has an accumulative effect: every detail come to light, every inscription left behind by a worker a generation ago, serves to make history visible, adds to the sense of time passing. This sense is heightened by a special detail: a layer of silver leaf, barely appreciable, applied to the wall near the back of the store. Over time, as the silver oxidizes, this square will change colors to a warm gold.

Yusuke Seki are Japan based Design team.
Their approach to design challenges is to conceptualise and revaluate into irreplaceable design with new interpretations. His designs embrace simplicity and minimalism at first glance and his inspiration comes directly from aspects which already exist within the context: such as materials, location, histories; all gathered and represented through the formal design approach. The function is essential in his design but through his work he focuses on facts and phenomena from the environment, including the essential design methods from the past, passed through to the future.

Voice of Coffee
Yusuke Seki

Jean-Michel Basquiat — Furious Man, 1982

Jean-Michel Basquiat - Furious Man, 1982

Jean-Michel Basquiat
Furious Man, 1982
Oilstick, acrylic, wax crayon and ink on paper

Mousse 64

Mousse 64 Summer 2018 Cover

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Mousse 64
Summer 2018

Mousse Magazine

Hu Ming — Dumplings

Hu Ming - Dumplings - Oil on Canvas

Hu Ming
Dumplings, 2013
Oil on canvas

Nike Just Don’t Quit

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