Villa Waalre by Russell Jones

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Villa Waalre by Russell Jones

Designed by Russell Jones, Villa Waalre is a minimalist house located in Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

Russel Jones

Photography by Rory Gardiner

Voice of Coffee — Yusuke Seki

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Voice of Coffee
Design by Yusuke Seki

A modern storefront brings the past to light
This coffee shop, located just off of a bustling district in Kobe, is housed in a former barbershop. The three letters above the entrance, “AAA,” are a vestige of its former use, reminding visitors of the history of the site. The façade, which used to extend to the street, has been set back and opened up as a glass front. The intervention creates an ENGAWA, a traditionally Japanese threshold space between the street and the shop interior, where guests can sit and enjoy their drinks while protected under a roof. While the setback reduces the actual amount of space inside the store, the addition of another spatial layer between interior and street ends up making the store feel deeper, and thus more spacious, than before.

The storefront incorporates a number of unusual strategies that are meant to momentarily throw off visitors, giving them pause and a chance to take a closer look at the details. Take, for example, the lower half of the front, which is composed of glass bricks stacked on top of one another. Whereas glass bricks are usually kept in place by a general metal frame, these elements are held together by the binding concrete alone – an unprecedented construction in Japan. The door handle, on the other hand, is made of two panes of glass, glued using a special adhesive on both sides of the glass door. The result is a completely transparent doorway, which allows guests to appreciate the natural hues of the material itself. The interior features a cupboard of glass and steel, whose gull-wing mechanism was developed by Yusuke Seki specially for this store.

Almost all of the structural elements were left as they were found during the demolition process. The wooden screen below the ceiling, for example, is the original timber frame that held up the suspended ceiling in the space’s former life, rediscovered as workers removed the plaster that had hidden it for years. The walls, too, have been left as they were after the workers had removed the finish covering them. Paradoxically, this subtractive approach has an accumulative effect: every detail come to light, every inscription left behind by a worker a generation ago, serves to make history visible, adds to the sense of time passing. This sense is heightened by a special detail: a layer of silver leaf, barely appreciable, applied to the wall near the back of the store. Over time, as the silver oxidizes, this square will change colors to a warm gold.

Yusuke Seki are Japan based Design team.
Their approach to design challenges is to conceptualise and revaluate into irreplaceable design with new interpretations. His designs embrace simplicity and minimalism at first glance and his inspiration comes directly from aspects which already exist within the context: such as materials, location, histories; all gathered and represented through the formal design approach. The function is essential in his design but through his work he focuses on facts and phenomena from the environment, including the essential design methods from the past, passed through to the future.

Voice of Coffee
Yusuke Seki

European Cultural Academy — Courses in Contemporary Architecture and Design

Courses in Contemporary Architecture and Design during Venice Biennale

Courses in Contemporary Architecture and Design during Venice Biennale
Summer courses at the European Cultural Academy in Venice
May 22–November 17, 2018

European Cultural Academy
4013 Campo Manin
30124 Venice
Italy

Courses in Contemporary Architecture and Design during Venice Biennale 2018.
The European Cultural Academy, Venice offers three summer courses this year that focus on architecture, the Biennale and design, specifically developed to align with the 16. Biennale Architettura—FREESPACE topic. The courses are constructed by James Taylor-Foster Contemporary curator at ArkDes, Sweden’s national centre for architecture and design and former European editor-at-large at ArchDaily.

Contemporary Architecture
The course fosters an understanding of the relationship between buildings and the city at large. Buildings are not isolated objects: they must react and respond to very particular urban conditions if they are to stand the test of time and, of course, delight us. In Venice this concern is particularly acute. These fundamental observations form the springboard for this course. The course is a combination of theory, workshops and visits. The introduction to People and Places provides the theoretical background while the workshop Drawing, Modelling & Photography provides the practical component. This segment of the course examines the three core tools in the architects’ toolbox: two- dimensional drawing, three-dimensional modelling, photography, and film. Visits include amongst others the Fondaco dei Tedeschi (by OMA), Venice Biennale and Punta della Dogana (by Tadao Ando).

Venice Biennale
This course gets to the grips with the 16th Architecture Biennale. Tours and reflections by experts and practitioners allows you to take the time to really see and understand the Biennale, large in scale and, for that reason, oftentimes intimidating: its history, contemporary position on the world stage, it’s unique model of exhibiting, and why it’s considered to be so important. Explore various ways to find your place in it: either as participant, organiser or experienced visitor. Visit the best country pavilions and have private tours with the organiser of Fentress Architects and Studio Daniel Libeskind installations.

Design: The World Around Us
This course focusses on understanding the role of design in relation to the built environment. In order to do this, it examines design as a broad topic: we are not interested in chairs, tables, and coffee cups. Design as field impacts all of us—at every moment of the day and across multiple scales. By exploring its relationship to architecture and urbanism, we aim to reveal its enduring relevance. The course is a combination of design theory and the significance of design at all scales, and what it means for our daily life. Further it explores colour theory, including myths and truths about the perception of colours. Visits include the iconic design sights such as the Olivetti Showroom and Orsoni Colour Library and meetings at local design studios.

europeanculturalacademy.com

The Gjøvik House – Norm Architects

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The Gjøvik House by Norm Architects

An hour north of Oslo, located on a majestic hill side facing the Norwegian woods and Mjøsa lake, lies the Gjøvik house; a modern and minimal cluster house created by Norm Architects.

The Gjøvik house, consisting of overlapping cubes of different sizes, makes for an intimate and dynamic family home with materials, levels and inbuilt, tailor-made furniture creating a minimal yet warm and secluded feeling. The house gracefully embraces the hill side terrain, merging with its surroundings in a humble and natural manner. Having thoroughly considered the climate in the process of designing the house, the idea behind the cluster style house was to give the home a cosy and inviting feel, where you can truly hibernate and take shelter from the frigid days of Nordic winter.

Placed on a hill side sloping towards Mjøsa lake in the breath-taking Norwegian woods, the house follows the slope in its composition, and faces the spectacular view. A large part of the facade faces the lake, but with an awareness towards creating small, private pockets and places where you can curl up come rain or shine. This creates a stunning yet intimate sensation. Selected views are framed in windows spread out between the cubes.

Lead architect: Linda Korndal

Norm Architects

Armonia Apartments – John Pawson

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Armonia Apartments
Athens, Greece
2011 – 2017

Observed from the pine-fringed bay, Armonia is designed to read as a graphically simple composition of slender white horizontal lines, framing full-height glass and bronze finished elements that quietly animate the elevations with rhythm and pattern. The goal of the design was to create a series of apartments where the sense of place is strong and expressed in a series of intimate relationships with the sea, the mountains, the surrounding gardens and the brilliance of the Aegean light.

Project Architect
Allan Bell

Project Team
Eleni Koryzi, Liliana Leal Albert, Rosanna May,
Kim Schuermann

Photography
Max Gleeson

Al-Jawad Pike – Private House, Shepherd’s Bush, London

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Private house, Shepherd’s Bush, London by Al-Jawad Pike

The scheme provides a new two-storey extension to a Victorian terraced house in West London. The client’s ambition to create a series of new rooms on the upper levels defined a massing approach where the new additions are formed from three interlocking masonry volumes. The existing narrow kitchen extension was dismantled in order to create a new kitchen and dining area at ground level with large skylight. The taller volume accommodates a study with an external terrace at first floor level; and a family bathroom at second floor level. A new zinc clad volume at roof level provides a guestroom with en-suite bathroom.

Al-Jawad Pike

House A – Walter&Walter

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House A
Melbourne, Australia

A house composed of a field of rooms that open and close in dialogue with the landscape.

Award Winner 2017- Australian Institute of Architects

Photography Ben Hosking

walterwalter.com.au

Al-Jawad Pike – Private House, Stoke Newington, London

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Private house, Stoke Newington, London

This project establishes a single storey L-shaped volume that infills the narrow passage to the side of the rear outrigger part of the house and integrates the existing ground floor to create a new large kitchen and dining area overlooking the garden. A large skylight brings top light into the centre of the house and a large timber framed sliding door maximises openness to the garden.

Photography: Ståle Eriksen

Al-Jawad Pike

Casa Alpes, Mexico City 2014

Casa Alpes, Mexico City 2014

Casa Alpes, Mexico City 2014

Casa Alpes, Mexico City 2014

Casa Alpes, Mexico City 2014

Casa Alpes, Mexico City 2014

Casa Alpes, Mexico City 2014

Casa Alpes, Mexico City 2014

Casa Alpes, Mexico City 2014

Casa Alpes, Mexico City 2014

Casa Alpes, Mexico City 2014

Productora
Casa Alpes, Mexico City 2014
Photos © Cristobal Palma

Apartment in Bryanston Square by DRDH Architects

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Apartment

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The completed project is for a piano nobile apartment within a Georgian house in Bryanston Square, Marylebone, United Kingdom, designed by DRDH Architects for the couturier Anna Valentine. The apartment restores aspects of the original house, notably the principal room to the square, whilst opening up the plan to light and the spatial interconnectedness of contemporary life. The atmosphere of the resultant spaces draws inspiration from the compelling, sparsely furnished interior paintings of Danish Artist Wilhelm Hammershoi (1864 – 1916), echoing their quiet introspection in sequence, arrangement and tonal palette. As in Hammershoi’s paintings of his home, at Strandgade 30 in Copenhagen, doors of varying scales not only mediate the relationships between new and existing elements but establish themselves as figures that occupy space and define its character. Bespoke furniture pieces form the kitchen within the main living space and a tall cabinet forms a freestanding enclosure to the master bedroom.

Designed by DRDH Architects
Located Bryanston Square, Marylebone, London, United Kingdom
Size 120 m²
2013

Menu Space – Norm Architects

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“Menu Space is our newly finished showroom, office, and café, designed specifically for Danish design company MENU.

With the goal of building a community around Menu as a design brand, Menu Space is a new creative initiative aimed at bringing likeminded creative thinkers closer to the brand and encouraging them to share their stories, ideas and processes. Featuring a showroom, office and café, we had the pleasure of helping this new approach to running a succesful design business to fruition by creating a space for great ideas, beautiful design, powerful concepts and inspiration as well as openness, knowledge sharing, co working, and collaborations.

With the goal of creating a welcoming space where everyone can stop by – for a coffee, a meeting, or simply to have a close up look at the designs of Menu – the interior is inspired by the raw and industrial setting of the surrounding area. Located in the upcoming Copenhagen neighbourhood surrounding the harbour in Nordhavn, the space draws heavy inspiration from strong materials such as concrete and steel, which can be seen throughout the space. This use of natural and durable materials provides a beautiful contrast to the objects and designs that fill the plateaus, floors, and corners.

The idea is to keep Menu Space moving and ever changing. To have friends of the house and people we admire stop by on a regular basis. In order to do so, the interior is highly flexible, making it easy to adjust, modify and change the interior layout of the space. This ensures that the showroom, as much as the office and café, stays vibrant, creative and lively that meets the needs of neighbours, visitors, friends, clients, and designers.”

Menu Space
Hamborg Plads
2150 Nordhavn
Denmark

Norm Architects

Seoul Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism

Seoul Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism 2017
Imminent Commons
September 1—November 5, 2017

seoulbiennale.org
Facebook / Instagram

Seoul Biennale 2017: Imminent Commons: A Debate: June 28, 6:30—8:30pm
New Lab, Building 128, Navy Yard
63 Flushing Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11205
United States

Press tour: August 31, 11am—1:30pm
Dongdaemun Design Plaza (DDP) and Donuimun Museum Village, Seoul

Opening: September 2, 3—7pm
Dongdaemun Design Plaza (DDP) and Donuimun Museum Village, Seoul

Co-directors: Hyungmin Pai, Alejandro Zaera-Polo
Organization: Seoul Metropolitan Government, Seoul Design Foundation

Imminent Commons
In an age of environmental decay and unprecedented wealth inequality, the cities of the world gather in Seoul to explore the urban parliaments where the politics of resources and technologies is enacted. The Seoul Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism 2017 is an experimental platform for an imminent urbanism that goes beyond human-centered function, ownership, and consumption to a commons of resources, technologies, and production. The cities of the world stand at a crossroads. Amidst radical social, economic, and technological transformations, will the city become a driving force of creativity and sustainability or will it be a mechanism of inequality and environmental decay? Cities are not only the drivers of social change but are now modifying ecosystems, geological structures, and even the climate. For the first time in history, the crucial questions of the city—climate change, biodiversity, air pollution, food security, automation, unemployment and inequality—are driven by concerns beyond human control and threaten the very survival of the planet. The principles of modern urbanism—the mass integration of production, employment, and consumption; the separation of work, dwelling, leisure, and transportation; the division between the natural and the artificial— are no longer effective at addressing the urgent questions of today’s cities. The traditional urban elements of buildings, streets, and neighborhoods must be reassessed within the emerging human and non-human urban constituencies.

Nine commons
The inaugural Seoul Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism proposes nine essential commons—four ecology commons of air, water, fire earth and six technology commons of making, moving, communicating, sensing, recycling—as a viable path towards a sustainable and just urbanism. Emerging from both ecological and technological concerns, this framework foregrounds an exploration not of distant utopias but of the very near future. In other words, these emerging commons are already changing the way we live in cities. Whether met with fear or hope, they will very soon change the way we live in the city. The Seoul Biennale provides a platform for an international array of participants—politicians, policy makers, experts, and citizens at large—presenting global research and engaging with local conditions.

Live, urban commons Seoul
Seoul is a grand laboratory for the imminent commons. Since its foundation more than 600 hundred years ago, Seoul has been a dynamic site of the commons, where politics and economy intertwined with the design of wind and water. It is a metropolis that maintains the spirit, methods, productivity, and spaces of the commons. In 2012, embarking on new policies of horizontal governance, sustainability, community based design, and economic equality, the Seoul Metropolitan Government proclaimed its vision as a City of Commons. Breaking open the gallery walls, the Seoul Biennale activates an urban constellation of urban sites, and citizen activity towards three live projects: Production City, Urban Foodshed, and Walking the Commons.

Seoul Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism 2017 focuses on issues and proposals, not on authors and works. Centered on the themes of Nine Commons, the Seoul Biennale is organized along two major sections: exhibitions installed during the Biennale period and the public programs during the corresponding year. The exhibitions consist of nine Commons, Commoning Cities and Live Projects. Public Programs include International Studios, Film and Video Program, Workshops, Lectures, Common Library and Tour Program which offer a communicative platform for visitors.

Book launch events
A book titled Seoul Biennale 2017: Imminent Commons, which works as a theoretical basis of the whole Biennale, will be published prior to the biennale. Co-organized by urbanNext, affiliated book launch events and think-tank programs will be held in New York and other cities. The event in New York will take place at New Lab, with one of the co-directors Alejandro Zaera-Polo and many of the authors of the book including Mitchell Joachim.

Information & Press contact
info@seoulbiennale.org / T +82 2 2096 0108

Franklin Mountain House – Hazelbaker Rush

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Franklin Mountain House, El Paso, Texas

American studio Hazelbaker Rush has created a mountainside residence where the lower levels blend into the rocky site, while the bright white upper volume stands out in contrast.

Hazelbaker Rush

Casa en Melides – Pedro Reis

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“The house in Melides, on the southern Alentejo Coast, by Pedro Reis, represents the desire for a holiday house as a getaway from the bustle of a big city. The client made the unusual decision to have an architectural competition between three distinct ateliers, allowing a choice from a wider range of possible solutions. This winning proposal presents a reading of the “drama” of the natural countryside, building it on top of a steep hill relatively protected by the surrounding “rugged topography”.”

Pedro Reis

Townhouse II in Central Copenhagen by Norm Architects

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Townhouse II
Central Copenhagen

“This conversion was a little bit different from the other one we did. Here our clients wanted a completely contemporary white and sleek space. So everything was torn down internally and completely rebuilt.

The main idea with this project was to create a sense of one big space vertically and enlarge the sense of space as much as possible. So everything was done in white and we opened up between the floors all the way by placing a transparent staircase to one side giving a view 9 metres to the ceiling on the top floor once entering the front door. The floors were done in white resin and the whole space only decorated with a few of the favourite things.”

Norm Architects