Krištof Kintera – We All Want to Be Cleaned, 2017

Krištof Kintera - We All Want to Be Cleaned, 2017

Krištof Kintera
We All Want to Be Cleaned, 2017
© Krištof Kintera

Krištof Kintera
Nervous Trees
September 7 — November 26, 2017

Galerie Rudolfinum
Alšovo nábřeží 12
110 00 Prague
Czech Republic

This autumn, Galerie Rudolfinum opened the 100th exhibition since its founding in 1994. To mark this anniversary, the gallery is hosting a large-scale exhibition project of Krištof Kintera which presents a summary of the last five years of the author’s oeuvre, and features some 20 sculptures, installations and interactive objects.

The exhibition title Nervous Trees references the eponymous objects which will nervously move in the main exhibition hall; in another, the visitor will have to make his way between pedestals made of polystyrene, the cosily familiar thermal insulation material, while its fragments whirling around in the gallery evoke a rather unpleasant snow storm. An important part of the exhibition includes the so-called laboratory, which takes the visitor right into the birthing process of Kintera’s ongoing installation Postnaturalia, about a hundred square metres of artificial landscape made of electronic devices—poetic and, at the same time, drastic. Samples of plastic flowers, files with herbariums and extensive video footage of creation of individual objects act as the landscape elements. The small gallery hall is dedicated to showing, in the form of dozens of drawings, the more intimate side of Kintera’s work. On the contrary, the larger gallery halls will host projects such as Nervous Trees (2013), a pillar made of Knauf mortar Do It Yourself (After Brancusi) (2007), a mouflon rearing to the sky like some creature of legends Electrons Seeking Spirit (2016), and other sculptures. As the first ever public screening, Galerie Rudolfinum is also showing Hands – Tools of Brain, a one-hour edit of approximately seven years’ worth of recorded footage of hands in the studio, as they destroy and test materials and techniques, and produce and assemble individual components of future sculptures and installation.

www.galerierudolfinum.cz

KAWS – Galerie Perrotin

KAWS, Galerie Perrotin Frieze Art Fair, London 003

KAWS, Galerie Perrotin Frieze Art Fair, London 001

KAWS, Galerie Perrotin Frieze Art Fair, London 002

KAWS
Galerie Perrotin
Frieze Art Fair
London

Chen Fei – Fine Art at Perrotin

Chen Fei - Fine Art at Perrotin 001

Chen Fei - Fine Art at Perrotin 002

Chen Fei - Fine Art at Perrotin 003

Chen Fei - Fine Art at Perrotin 004

Chen Fei - Fine Art at Perrotin 005

Chen Fei - Fine Art at Perrotin 006

Chen Fei - Fine Art at Perrotin 007

Chen Fei - Fine Art at Perrotin 008

Chen Fei - Fine Art at Perrotin 009

Chen Fei
Fine Art
Solo Show
Opening Thursday September 7, 4 – 9 pm
September 7 – October 7, 2017

Perrotin Paris proudly presents Chen Fei’s “Fine Art”, Chen Fei’s first solo show in Paris follows 2014’s “Flesh and Me” at Perrotin Hong Kong.

Born in 1983 in Shanxi province, graduated from the Department of Fine Art at the Beijing Film Academy, Chen Fei sardonically exploits art history, raiding the canon to mark its otherness. Scavengers (2010), based on John Everett Millais’s iconic Pre-Raphaelite painting Ophelia (1851-2), shows a young woman wading in a forest pond, shing out Ophelia / Chen Fei’s body (with écorché gut). Xiao Wu Ji (2012), lightly references Manet’s A Bar at the Folies-Bergère (1882), with a bored shop assistant at an electronics stand. In his new paintings however, Chen Fei’s previously incidental investigations into Western and Eastern art history and practice are developed into a central theme.

Perrotin

Rob and Nick Carter – Yoga Photograms

Rob and Nick Carter - Yoga Photograms 001

Rob and Nick Carter - Yoga Photograms 002

Rob and Nick Carter - Yoga Photograms 003

Rob and Nick Carter - Yoga Photograms 004

Rob and Nick Carter - Yoga Photograms 005

Rob and Nick Carter - Yoga Photograms 006

Rob and Nick Carter - Yoga Photograms 007

Rob and Nick Carter - Yoga Photograms 008

Husband and wife artistic duo Rob and Nick Carter pay homage to the holistic eastern practice of yoga through a series of photograms. Depicting a range of traditional sanskrit postures, the photograms — images made by placing objects directly onto a light-sensitive surface — depict life-size female forms engaging in the meditative art. the project explores both the experiential nature of each position, as well as the technical transformation of the visual image.

[via designboom]

Henri Matisse – Visage, 1952

Henri Matisse – Visage, 1952
India ink and brush on paper
25 ½ x 19 5/8 in.

Louise Bourgeois – Twosome, 1991

Louise Bourgeois, Twosome, 1991

Louise Bourgeois, Twosome, 1991.
Steel, paint and electric light, 190.5 x 193 x 1244.6 cm.

Louise Bourgeois
Twosome
September 8, 2017–January 20, 2018

Tel Aviv Museum of Art
The Golda Meir Cultural and Art Center
27 Shaul Hamelech Blvd
Tel Aviv 61332012
Israel

www.bourgeois-tamuseum.org.il

Curators: Jerry Gorovoy and Suzanne Landau

For the first time in Israel, the Tel Aviv Museum of Art is presenting a comprehensive solo exhibition dedicated to groundbreaking French-American artist Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010), one of the most brilliant, prominent, and influential women in 20th century art. The exhibition explores the duality in Bourgeois’s concepts and forms; the dialogues between inside and outside, conscious and unconscious, male and female, the body and architecture, passive and active.

Bourgeois, who passed away at the age of 98, left a fascinating body of work combining sexuality and psychoanalysis, which greatly contributed to the development of Feminist theory. Her artistic career spanned seven decades, but it was not until 1982, when Bourgeois, by then 71-years old, became the first woman artist to be given a large-scale sculpture retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, that she got her big break and gained wide recognition. This turning point confirmed her status as an inspiring, leading contemporary artist whose dramatic works—which explore family relations, parenthood, marital relationships, femininity, masculinity, pain, passion, and aggression—are profound and revealing in their intricacy.

The exhibition Twosome, focusing on relationships, will feature over 50 works—monumental as well as small sculptures, textile works, and drawings—from all the major phases and periods in Bourgeois’s career, including some of her best-known pieces. It will include, among others, the iconic steel sculpture Spider Couple (2003)—the spider being a hallmark of Bourgeois; the provocative sculpture Fillette (Sweeter Version) (1968–99)—a phallus representing frail, vulnerable masculinity; and Passage Dangereux (1997)—the largest and most significant work in the series of Cells, which comprises enclosed cage-like spaces containing symbolic domestic objects.

The exhibition will be centered on Bourgeois’s monumental sculpture Twosome, created in 1991 and unveiled in a show at the New York MoMA later that year. This rarely exhibited sculpture now lends its name to this exhibition at Tel Aviv Museum of Art. The work is made of two large steel tanks flooded with flickering red light, the smaller tank rolling in and out of the larger tank. This repeated mechanical movement elicits sexual connotations, although Bourgeois herself maintained that it addressed mother-child relations—the basic, primary two-person relationship which determines all future relationships.

The exhibition Twosome was produced by Tel Aviv Museum of Art in collaboration with the Easton Foundation. It is accompanied by a bi-lingual (Hebrew-English) catalogue.

KAWS – Untitled, 1999

KAWS
Untitled, 1999

Odarodle – An imaginary their_story of naturepeoples, 1535-2017

Odarodle - An imaginary their_story of naturepeoples, 1535-2017

Exhibition 21 July 2017 – 16 October 2017
Odarodle – An imaginary their_story of naturepeoples, 1535-2017

Vernissage: July 20th 2017, 6 pm

Pre-Opening Manifestation Parade: July 20th, 4.30 pm (gathering in front of “Speisekammer im Eldorado” supermarket, corner of Motzstraße/Kalckreutstraße)

The artistic research exhibition Odarodle – an imaginary their_story of naturepeoples, 1535-2017 casts, for the first time, a postcolonial perspective on the collection and history of the Schwules Museum*. The exhibition proposes a thought-exercise: that there are problematic associations between the museum representation of homosexualities and the ethnological display formats developed over the course of European colonialism. Odarodle presents the work of 16 artists, mostly Berlin-based, including 10 newly commissioned pieces. These contemporary positions respond to the Museum, its archive, and its practices as both research material and aesthetic medium.

Odarodle specifically turns “Eldorado” backwards. As a site of multiple origins, it is a threefold reference: an historical exhibition, a legendary night club, and a colonial myth. Though the commitment of the Schwules Museum* to enable LGBTIQ cultural visibility bespeaks a greater political agenda of liberation, the contemporary relevance of such a (self-)representational undertaking requires revision and reflection. A more expansive, less obvious scale of critical engagement, as proposed by Odarodle, considers the deeper operations within Modernity that have attempted to exhibit forms of life, their bodies, and their habitats. This is where the desire to show the manners and mores of a kind of “people” and their “nature” confronts the postcolonial challenges of the ethnographic museum: a site that has historically sought to visualize the existence of the “Other” and, in doing so, maintains the “Other” as a normative construction.

The project’s primary point of departure is the seminal exhibition Eldorado: Homosexuelle Frauen und Männer in Berlin 1850-1950 – Geschichte, Alltag, und Kultur, which opened in 1984 at the Berlin Museum in West-Berlin and is considered by the Schwules Museum* as its institutional origin. Starting with a range of legal, medical, and literary discussions on the “nature” of sexuality and the “identity” of same-sex love, the exhibition Eldorado turned its focus onto the cultural and sociopolitical climate of the ‘20s and ‘30s in Berlin. Documents, photographs, prints, and paintings were displayed in vitrines and on thematically-arranged presentation boards, while specific “environments” were recreated with everyday objects to convey atmospheres – the gay boudoir, the lesbian café, the Tiergarten cruising area. Read more…

Schwules Museum*

Stefan Dotter – L’immorale

Stefan Dotter L'immorale 2015

Stefan Dotter
L’immorale
2015
Fuji Crystal Print glossy on Alu Dibond, Floater frame Basel black, Ed. 5 + 1AP
45 cm x 30 cm

Stefan Dotter (b. 1993, Bamberg, Germany ) is a Berlin-based photographer and painter whose work centers around the exploration of organic shapes in contemporary art and fashion on one hand and classic travel photography under the mentoring of Sebran D’Argent on the other hand. Romanticism and escapism marks the essence of his work.

Sleek Art

Maria Loboda – To Separate the Sacred From the Profane, 2016

Maria Loboda, To Separate the Sacred From the Profane, 2016 © Blaise Adilon

Maria Loboda: La Fête, La Musique, La Noce
Charwei Tsai
Jef Geys
June 2–August 13, 2017

Institut d’art contemporain, Villeurbanne/Rhône-Alpes
11 rue Docteur Dolard
69100 Villeurbanne
France

La Fête, La Musique, La Noce (Fun, Music and Festivities) were, in fact, all euphemisms, in the colourful slang of Napoleon’s grand army, for “war”—La Guerre.

The three words are the battle cry of Maria Loboda’s one-woman show at the IAC, her biggest ever in France. But, lurking under this slightly baroque exhibition title with its blithe overtones of jollity and merriment, there is a sense of menace. An underlying tension sets in early and stays with the visitor until the end of the exhibition.

More interested in the imperfections and meanderings of history than she is in the archaeological evidence for it or in its legitimate functions, Maria Loboda bases her work on the interpretation and re-appropriation of rituals and, by extension, the symbols specific to different communities.

i-ac.eu

Damien Hirst – Eat: Eat the Rich Series

Eat – Eat the Rich Series
Damien Hirst

Unframed dimensions: 1016 x 762 mm (40 x 30 inches)
Framed dimensions: 1066 x 812 mm (42 x 32 inches)
Frame: Wooden with glass card and backing
Silkscreen print
Edition of 150
Signed and numbered
Published by Other Criteria

‘Eat the Rich’ is a new series of twelve screenprints that depicts pharmaceutical packaging in which the tablet’s brand name has been replaced by a word implying violence or force. The series expands upon Hirst’s long-standing interest in the aesthetics of pharmaceutical packaging, which first manifested in his early ‘Medicine Cabinets’ series. Similar to the thirteen-part ‘Last Supper’ screenprints, ‘Eat the Rich’ illustrates the artist’s “obsession with the body”(1) and the medical industry attached to it, in which confidence is exuded through minimalist designs that perpetuate “the modernist fantasy […] that everyone and everything can be cured.”(2)

1) Damien Hirst cited in Damien Hirst and Gordon Burn, ‘On the Way to Work’ (Faber and Faber, 2001), 25
2) Ibid., 210

Marilyn Minter – Absinthe, 2017

Marilyn Minter – Absinthe, 2017

Marilyn Minter
Absinthe, 2017

C-print, 60x49cm / 24 x 16″
Printed by Griffins Studio
Ed. 35/ XV/ 15 APs
Signed and numbered certificate

Edition for Parkett 100/101

Parkett

Richard Prince – Untitled (From Cowboys and Girlfriends), 1992

Richard Prince - Untitled (From Cowboys and Girlfriends), 1992

Richard Prince
Untitled (From Cowboys and Girlfriends), 1992
Lot Number 67
Chromogenic print
24 x 20 in (60.96 x 50.8 cm)
Artist’s Proof outside main edition of 26
Initialed on verso

Paddle8

Ed Ruscha – Periods, 2006

Ed Ruscha – Periods, 2006

Ed Ruscha
Periods, 2006
Lot Number 25
Lithograph
29 x 28 in (73.66 x 71.12 cm)
Framed
17 of 60
Courtesy of Rosina Lee Yue
Signed

Paddle8

Damien Hirst – Anarchy: Eat the Rich Series

Damien Hirst - Eat the Rich Series: Anarchy

Anarchy – Eat the Rich Series
Damien Hirst

Unframed dimensions: 1016 x 762 mm (40 x 30 inches)
Framed dimensions: 1066 x 812 mm (42 x 32 inches)
Frame: Wooden with glass card and backing
Silkscreen print
Edition of 150
Signed and numbered
Published by Other Criteria

‘Eat the Rich’ is a new series of twelve screenprints that depicts pharmaceutical packaging in which the tablet’s brand name has been replaced by a word implying violence or force. The series expands upon Hirst’s long-standing interest in the aesthetics of pharmaceutical packaging, which first manifested in his early ‘Medicine Cabinets’ series. Similar to the thirteen-part ‘Last Supper’ screenprints, ‘Eat the Rich’ illustrates the artist’s “obsession with the body”(1) and the medical industry attached to it, in which confidence is exuded through minimalist designs that perpetuate “the modernist fantasy […] that everyone and everything can be cured.”(2)

1) Damien Hirst cited in Damien Hirst and Gordon Burn, ‘On the Way to Work’ (Faber and Faber, 2001), 25
2) Ibid., 210

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